Winter at the Owenabue River, Carrigaline, County Cork

In Winter,“the tree looks dead, but we know it is beginning a very deep creative process, out of which will come Spring and Summer” (Corita Kent)

Normally I would write my own post, but I have to say I cannot write a thing that is more spot on than what I will share with you here. For some time I have been following Austin Kleon, and I just absolutely love his newsletter which pops into my email box every week. It is a joy to read and I learn loads from it, I really do. I have tried to think why I follow Mr. Kleon, or where I found him, I think it may be through a link from Dan Pink (whom I also follow for obvious reasons considering my work in coaching and training). Anyway I digress.

I was like Austin Kleon when I heard people describing how I am feeling as ‘languishing’, it just felt wrong somehow. Languishing conjures up for me a picture of a lady, lying on a ‘chaise-longue’ (look it up) with a fan, day dreaming, sleepy, waiting for something to happen, a general feeling of apathetic drowsy ‘meh’. I much prefer what Mr. Kleon has identified: it resonates with me, and you can read about it here to see if it aligns with how you feel too. Enjoy, no really, try his newsletter. I often disagree with him but am always intrigued and totally immersed so that time flies by as I follow the trails set by the links within the text. It’s so different to what I normally read: a set of creative, artistic wonderings and therein lies its beauty. I never fail to be inspired; always enjoying what I read, I am challenged: just what I want from a newsletter: perfect!

So how am I feeling right now, after a year of pandemic, months and months of lockdown, illness for myself and my family, total re-think of my work and life focus: certainly I am not languishing, rather, I am busy quietly, gently transforming internally; so yes, dormant is a better word to describe it: with lots going on inside ready to blossom when the time is right and that time is imminent.

Early Summer at the Owenabue River, Carrigaline, County Cork

“Sometimes the harshest Winters yielded the most glorious Springs” (Corita Kent)

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